Monumental Moves at Curlfest

Governor Cuomo recently signed the “Natural Discrimination Bill” to prohibit  hairstyle discrimination in the work place. A huge win for the Afro-community! So it’s no wonder that although each year the Curly Girl Collective hosts its annual event: Curlfest, this year, there seems to be a bigger reason to celebrate! Women of many different hues were showing off their versatile hairstyles and trendy outfits!

Curlfest is hosted annually by the Curly Girl Collective’s founders Charisse Higgins, Simone Mair, Tracey Coleman, Gia Lowe and Melody Henderson, all women of color themselves, from varying backgrounds. The festival gives women and men of color the platform for them to showcase their culture and celebrate their roots. Despite the change of location this year, individuals still made their way out to Randall's Island, a long ways from their previous festivals held in Prospect Park, Brooklyn.


Curlfest included different panel discussions, live band and DJ and  booths from big brand name hair vendors such as Deva Curl, Shea Moisture and many more! Many were excited and shared their personal opinions about Curlfest, what they are looking forward to and why it is important for companies to promote & support black hair freedom. 

We were able to catch up with a few of the attendees and get their thoughts on the importance of Curlfest, with the social squad covering the event.

Khadijah (@k_naia_)

What is the significance of Curlfest to you?

“ Getting to be proud of your hair. Getting to be proud of the patterns of your curls. No one will tell you your hair is too nappy or that is not how your hair is supposed to be. Be proud of your natural beauty, your natural light.”

How important is it for you to have black owned companies that understand your hair type? 

“It is very important, it’s empowering to be honest. It shows that we are growing as a community and supporting each other at the end of the day.”


Jadzia (@jy_mulanic)

What is the significance of Curlfest to you?

“Being proud of the type of hair that you have and how hair is so versatile. If you are a hair lover like me, you would definitely look forward to the different colors and ways our hair can be worn”


How important is it for you to have black owned companies that understand your hair type? 

“ A lot of what we know is not supportive of black beauty but having companies that are helping showcasing the beauty of our hair is important. It helps amplify what we know to the world. And exposes it to people for people outside the culture to see and that is important.


Erin

What is the significance of Curlfest to you?

“ Has created a community of women who have had hair or does have hair who has not been seen in a positive light in society, but now it is our time to shine and Curlfest provides a safe space to enjoy and celebrate us.”


How important is it for you to have black owned companies that understand your hair type? 

“ it's very important, you can not give me products for my hair if you never had my hair. Back in the day our hair section would be about a centimeter long but now I have aisle to choose from that can help nourish my hair and let it grow.”


Beverly (@curlybeviie)

What is the significance of Curlfest to you?

“ Good to come to a place that are filled with people embracing the same things that you are.Its a good feeling to be around like-minded people who come together to embrace their natural hair and who they are. We are different, but we are similar at the same time.”


What brings you out here today? 

“ I’m actually  out here because i am apart of the Curlfest social squad and I will be on the empowerment panel.”

How important is it for you to have black owned companies that understand your hair type?

“ There is so much out there for others. But for blacks it's hard to find black owned businesses so we can keep our money within the community. I feel like it will be good to support and uplift each other. We don't have much, so it is important to have something just for us.”